Tooth / Teeth Implants

There are plenty of options available to you if you have twisted teeth. The Dental Centre Morningside applies composite resin bonding techniques to contour and bond the existing teeth, making them appear straighter. For more severe cases, where teeth cannot be saved, partial or complete dentures may be recommended. Partial dentures are prosthetic devices which can be fixed or removable, alternatively full sets of upper or lower teeth are cast in acrylic or metal/acrylic.

 

REPLACEMENT OF ONE TOOTH

Young people who are born with an hereditary failure to produce teeth or are involved in an accident can be helped to replace a lost tooth without needing to file down healthy and beautiful neighbouring teeth to support a bridge.

This is possible as the implant tooth replaces both the lost natural tooth and its root. Young people under the age of 16 should not be treated with implants as their jaws are still not fully developed.

Tooth/Teeth ExtractionBrite SmileTooth replacement

 

REPLACEMENT OF SEVERAL TEETH

Later in life, often between 40 and 50, teeth are lost as a result of loosening of teeth (periodontitis), caries or fractures in teeth with root fillings. This type of tooth loss usually begins at the back of the mouth. In these situations, multiple independent implants can be an excellent alternative, as the patient’s remaining teeth do not need to be involved. In this way, the patient is not dependent on the condition of his or her own teeth for the bridge to continue functioning for many years.

REPLACEMENT IN CONJUNCTION WITH ENDENTULOUSNESSREPLACEMENT IN CONJUNCTION WITH ENDENTULOUSNESSREPLACEMENT IN CONJUNCTION WITH ENDENTULOUSNESS

 

REPLACEMENT IN CONJUNCTION WITH ENDENTULOUSNESS

If you have lost all the teeth in one of your jaws, there are two basic treatment alternatives. You can either have a denture or you can choose implant treatment. A denture works in many cases, but as time passes the underlying bone is reabsorbed so that the prosthesis fits less well. Many people nowadays are totally unable to tolerate a prosthesis for psychological or social reasons. This group is growing every day as people find out about a better alternative – in other words, implants. The feeling of recovering your “own” teeth results in a totally different quality of life.

CROWN AND BRIDGE TREATMENT
CROWN AND BRIDGE TREATMENT
PFM Crowns to be replaced on both centrals and the left lateral.
CROWN AND BRIDGE TREATMENT
A Root fracture is confirmed in the left central.
CROWN AND BRIDGE TREATMENT
After extraction a Replace Select WP is installed. Immediate Function is applied by subsequently placing a temporary crown.

A Procera Abutment Zirconia, with transmuccosal profile and a Procera Crown Alumina.

Right central and left lateral are prepared and provide with metal ceramic posts and cores, and the Procera Abutment Zirconia is placed.

Three Procera Crown Alumina after cementation. No black margins on biocompatible materials. Stable soft tissue level on implant and around crowns.

View the Crown & Bridge Before and After gallery.

STEP BY STEP IMPLANT TREATMENT

The treatment is made up of a number of steps and is divided into a surgical section and a prosthetic section. The surgical and prosthetic treatment should be performed by a specialist in prosthetics or a general dental practitioner with special additional training. If you have no teeth of your own, no preparatory treatment is normally needed. If, on the other hand, you still have some poor teeth which need to be removed, the jawbone will need to heal before implant treatment can begin.

STEP 1 – Fixture Placement

Using a precise operating technique, the surgeon fits small screw like units, fixtures, made of titanium in your jawbone. In simple terms, you could say that they are your new dental roots. Five to six of these fixtures are normally fitted in a totally-edentulous jaw. The operation takes 2 to 3 hours and is normally performed under local anaesthesia. No major discomfort is normally felt either during or after the operation.

 

STEP 2 – The healing period

To enable your jawbone to accept the fixtures, or “osseointegrate”, as it is known, you have to be prepared to be without your prosthesis for 1 to 2 weeks after fixture placement. If you have some of your own teeth left, you can have a temporary bridge during this period. You can then use your old prosthesis in basically the same way as before. The healing period is normally 3 to 6 months, depending on whether the upper or the lower jaw is involved, for example.

 

STEP 3 – Connecting the abutment

When the fixtures have osseointegrated and are permanently anchored to the jawbone, a second operation is performed. This time the surgeon attaches extensions, also known as abutments, to the fixtures. These abutments pass through the gums and the finished bridge is attached to them at a later stage. The production of your new permanent teeth begins at the very latest during the weeks following abutment connection.

 

STEP 4 – The prosthetic work

Work on your new implant-anchored bridge begins by taking impressions of your mouth. This is followed by a further 5 to 6 visits. During these visits you and the dentist decide on the appearance of the bridge and teeth. After 3 to 4 weeks you achieve your objective and the new implant-supported bridge is delivered. You now have permanent teeth once again and hopefully they will feel just like part of you. Your new bridge must be cared for and checked regularly, in just the same way as you would do with your own natural teeth.